psusuccess

First International Pharmacists Graduate PSU

Three students from Iraq, the first international graduates in Pharmacy, have received diplomas from Perm State University (PSU) – marking the start of 2022 with a bright spot in their academic career.

Today, PSU is proud to be the only ‘classical’ university in Russia to teach Pharmacy – besides a greater variety of faculties and courses, both science and arts. Although PSU has had a long tradition of teaching chemistry and medicine back a century ago, after a long break it revised the “Pharmacy” Program in Russian language since 2016, and in English since 2017. The first international graduates in Pharmacy, using the English language fully, will graduate PSU in 2022.

“We are eager to expand the geography of admission of international students for the Pharmacy  program. I believe, the competences gained through the course will be in demand, globally.  The graduates of our Faculty surely have an advantage, as their knowledge and skills are a joint result of a classical fundamental approach meeting modern applied techniques,”

comments Irina Mashevskaya, Dean of the Faculty of Chemistry, PSU.

PSU students in Pharmacy learn to test the pharmacological activity of drugs, study their manufacture, develop strategies for their promotion on the market, and even build pharmaceutical enterprises.

According to our graduate Al-Zeyad Ali (Iraq), he chose the pharmaceutical course at Perm State University intentionally: “My Dad is a biologist and also an analytical chemist. My Mom is a veterinarian. Our family runs our own lab for analysis, so many people advised me to study pharmaceuticals. After my graduation here in Russia, I will spend another study year in Iraq in order to confirm my degree, in my native language. I will definitely work in a pharmacy or in a hospital. If I decide to continue my studies, it will be the veterinary medicine, since I tend to like this particular profession. Overall, I hope to lend a hand to my parents, and thank them for everything they have invested in me throughout my life.”

Expert in Politics Appears Guest on New PSU Podcast, Shares Inspiration in Science

Mikhail Grabevnik, senior lecturer at the Department of Political Science, Perm State University has become the first guest of the Voice of Science podcast. Run previously in a video format, the podcast allows now to listen to scientists and researchers while on the move.  

Although Mikhail looked forward to study law after graduating school, by fortune, he became a student of the Faculty of History and Political Science. There, he discovered a broader variety of disciplines and became interested in political processes and institutions.

“I grew passion for research while preparing my graduation thesis, which incorporated comparative analysis of the Churches of Russia and Ukraine stepping into politics. I enjoyed working with data, and I liked the fact my analysis led to particular results. Although my student thesis showed little scientific novelty on a global scale, it did stimulate me for a further research,”

recollects Mikhail Grabevnik.

Gradually, the scholar switched his research interest to European regionalism, addressing the issues of subjectivity of European regionalist parties, and the development of separatist movements in modern Europe. Today, Mikhail is engaged in the study of subnational regionalism.

“I am thrilled to generate patterns from a large array of data, being the first one to see what others do not see. It surely involves some kind of competitive potential. I find it a boost to my research activity, otherwise I would not have enough strength or time to do science,”

says Mikhail Grabevnik.

In 2020, Mikhail Grabevnik, defended his PhD (Candidate of Political Science) thesis exploring the phenomenon of regionalist parties, using the example of the Scottish National Party (SNP). The scholar analyzed the dynamics of the SNP political strategies throughout the devolutionary period in Scotland (1997-2019).

The Faculty of History and Political Sciences at PSU offers various disciplines for future careers in politics, government, public and international relations. The Faculty publishes 3 dedicated academic journals included into the State Commission for Academic Degrees and Titles list. The Faculty graduates are listed among most successful alumni both on regional and national levels.

Step Into Chinese New Year – Singing Song About a Snowflake!

Song Tianyao (China), a graduate of Perm State University has recorded an unusual congratulation on the Chinese New Year. (As a sleeve note: Song Tianyao has recently defended her PhD (candidate of sciences) thesis in philology at PSU, congratulations!). Today, singing the famous Snowflake Song, she addressed all those Chinese and international students interested in East Asian culture – wishing everyone a happy holiday:

“… The New Year’s on the way,

Will make your dream come true:

As long as snowflakes are not melting,

Don’t let the snowflakes keep on melting –

Until the clock tower ends the tune,

Until the clock tower ends the tune…”

For the Chinese people, the New Year is not just a change of dates, as it marks the start of spring and so blossoming of nature. The astrological sign of 2022 is the Tiger, who shows respect to beauty and people following it. While the Tiger prefers the red color, the tradition in general supports fires and loud noises, believed to scare evil forces away. On the night of 31 January to 1 February, fireworks were around the University campus – the Chinese students celebrating the entry into a new life cycle.

“I would like to congratulate all those Chinese students currently studying in Russia on the Spring Festival,” says Song Tianyao. “We all know the severe virus situation makes us hard to follow it. Yet, I believe together we can overcome this challenge.”

The holiday begins a week before the event itself – started with a general cleaning, for the Tiger loves clean houses and hardworking people. Despite the distance from their homeland, each student strives to decorate a hostel space with bright colors – using lanterns and symbols of the year as decor. Students call their parents, yet refrain from communal celebrations around a broad dinner table with dumplings:

“For me, this New Year is quite unusual, as I am celebrating it alone, trying to stay safe and escape the potential illness. With the completion of my studies, I am planning to get back to China, so I have to limit my social contacts,” Song Tianyao admits.

The Snowflake Song was first performed in “The Magicians” Soviet film in 1982 by Olga Rozhdestvenskaya and the Good Fellows band. Although not a holiday hit, it became a favorite choice among many later artists, from pop to punk – seeing several remakes in 2002, 2008, 2014 and 2016.

“I came into this song completely by accident. Immediately since I heard it, I liked it. Our New Year’s songs are not related to winter, as we have a different climate all across China. And, in some parts, like the South, we don’t have snow at all,” the Chinese graduate shares.

On her arrival back home, not only Song Tianyao will be able to chat with her family at a holiday dinner, set fireworks and make a traditional family photo; she will also launch a paper lantern, lifting a card with her wishes up into the skies. Meanwhile, Perm State University will remain in touch with her and other alumni, waiting for new students and hoping for a brighter new year.

For reference:

For three years, Song Tianyao has been working as an assistant for the Department of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics, PSU and teaching Chinese language to students of three faculties – Philology, Geography and Modern Foreign Languages and Literature. In December 2021, Song Tianyao defended her PhD (candidate of sciences) thesis on Artistic Reception of B. Vasiliev’s Military Prose in China.

In the academic year 2021-2022 at PSU, 28 people, including 22 foreigners (21 students from China and 1 native of Japan), are enrolled in the 1st year postgraduate course in Linguistics and Literary Studies – mostly due to another PSU alumnus from China, who currently teaches at the Chengdu Institute of the Sichuan University of Foreign Studies.

Study in Perm, Build Career in France: Motivation Advice by PSU Alumnus

Looking for opportunities besides studying in Russia? Elena Mezentseva, graduate of the Faculty of Modern Foreign Languages and Literature (2017), manager in international education at the Quartier Latin (Paris-Moscow), shares her vision of turning University years into future prospects and career.

Interviewer: How did your professional prospects grow after graduating from Perm State University?

Elena: After completing a bachelor’s degree at PSU, I continued my master’s studies at the University of Grenoble-Alpes, France, with whom our Department of Linguistics and Translation has had a long-time partnership. My home bachelor’s degree as a linguist and translator made it possible to study other related disciplines, like science du langage, langues étrangères appliquées, communication multilingue. So, I chose to do a master’s degree in langues, littératures et civilizations étrangères et régionales in études russes. Studying at PSU and the University of Grenoble-Alpes encouraged my passion for academic mobility. Not only did I regard this only as an opportunity to study abroad and host for foreign students back home, I also became interested in the logistics and preparations involved, acquiring to the adaptation of foreign students.

The academic internships in France for bachelor’s degree and mobility projects implemented in master’s degree defined my professional ambitions and outcomes. After completing my master’s degree, I started working remotely for the Quartier Latin company, assisting with training and settling in France.

Int.: Do you believe the knowledge gained at PSU became useful for your future?

Elena: Apart fromspecific knowledge of translation, theory of foreign languages and intercultural communication, the study at PSU helped me acquire general skills of critical thinking, data search and public speaking – making it possible to successfully pass a master’s course in France. Until today, I am applying these competencies at communicating with foreign students, running international business correspondence, and doing my duties as an interpreter and a translator.

As information becomes quickly irrelevant in a changing world, the knowledge gained during the University years prove to be most comprehensive and timeless.

Int.: Could you, please, share some vivid memories of your student years?

Elena: There have been plenty ofbright and memorable moments, since the very first year! These, of course, include training courses in Grenoble and Paris, which had become pivot points for me. I also recollect our University’s centennial celebration, when the campus turned into one whole festival town, full of live performances, happenings and art spaces.

Yet, perhaps, the most important event, or change was meeting my wonderful classmates, with whom we became real friends, as well as bright teachers, whose advice and guidance helps me a lot, until today!

Int.: What could you wish the future University applicants?

Elena: The student years is a unique time that gives a lot of new friends, knowledge and perspectives. Make sure you use every opportunity possible, and show your own initiative in that search, too. Do participate in exchange programs, scientific conferences, extracurricular activities, as this will allow you to meet different people, broaden your horizons and shape your goals. While still a student, try to put into practice what you have learned, as this will add value to your CV. May your student years be interesting, rewarding and exciting! And, be sure that joining the Faculty of Modern Foreign Languages and Literature, you will find yourself in a large academic family, a source for support and professional confidence, indeed!

Interview source (in Russian): Department of Linguistics and Translation, Faculty of Modern Foreign Languages and Literature, PSU

A Story of PSU Student in Search of Homeplace – to and from Dubai, Back to Perm

Olga Averkieva, a senior teacher at the Department of Journalism and Mass Communications at Perm State University (PSU) has brought together the stories of nine characters who had left Perm but came back to discover their own way in local arts, business and social life, as a set of documentary shorts – uniting them into the “Back Home” Film Project.  

The fifth short episode shows Lidia Skornyakova, a graduate student of the Faculty of Philology, PSU. Having had entered the University once, studying Journalism and Philology here, she then worked as an exhibition manager and art critic for the Yeltsin Center, Ekaterinburg, Russia, and later moved to Dubai, UAE. Yet, she got back to Perm… Following Lidia, in her own words:

“This is a brief story how I learned to be happy – getting back to where I once belonged. I was born in Perm. After school, I entered the Faculty of Philology at Perm State University. I initially went to study journalism, but got bored, and switched to philology, since I had always been into foreign languages. By 2011, when I was supposed to graduate from the Faculty of Philology, I experienced life crisis. That time, I found escape to be the only way to resolve my problems. I decided that moving to a different city and connecting myself to a different activity would make me different, too – and so shake my previous burdens off. I got carried away by an idea of becoming an art critic. I went to the city of Yekaterinburg, 3,5 hours car drive from Perm, and started looking for a job. My first serious professional occupation was the one at the Yeltsin Center, dedicate to the 1st Russian President and his era. The project had just been launched, encouraging each one of us to do our best. I remember myself getting into the thick of it, quite intensely. “

“The first time I went abroad was in 2012, a trip to Thailand. It all seemed a different planet to me, contrasting to my own environment and family’s vision that travels are for the rich people, as they don’t mind wasting money on nonsense; “What for? At which expense? Why not buy something practical, like kitchen crockery, instead?” After leaving the Yeltsin Center, I flew to Dubai. And, while I was moaning there to a female friend of mine, saying I didn’t want to return neither to Perm, nor Yekaterinburg… since after the Yeltsin Center everything seemed so low-scale and much too common to me… my friend told me: “Go, try find a job here! Elsewise, what’s the use of studying English for so many years?’ So, I did go and did find one. I became a real estate consultant with a 1,5 year contract. Gradually, I started getting tired of Dubai, feeling lack of cultural activity and native language communication in its deeper sense – looking for ideas and things to discuss instead of everyday routine, you know? I was missing performances, plays, theaters. The situation at my work did not get better, either. First, I realized that selling real estate was not my cup of tea. And, secondly, there was a moment when they decided to fire everyone right on New Year’s Eve. I didn’t like the idea of waiting for my turn, and flew back to Perm. ”

“Gosh, finding myself back home in Perm, I rushed headlong to the local stage scene and shows, at last! I did everything I could: the Philharmonic, the Organ Hall, the Cultural and Business Center, the Opera and Ballet Theater, and many other places, almost every day. I started thinking of where to study. And, as I stepped onto the University campus, something clicked – as it always did, and does every time I get in here: my goodness, how cool is the vibe, that’s  the place I’ve been missing! The Master’s Degree in Chinese was well announced, so, I passed the exams, and our Dean Dr. Boris Kondakov called me to say: Welcome to the Faculty, glad to have you back! “

“When I started my Master’s, I had been working, already. An old friend of mine had offered me to take part in a cool project by the Morse Code Creative Agency – a company dealing with museum design. As a result, I started a project that I am finishing now, telling the story of Perm basketball. I see it as my personal ‘Yeltsin Center’. Most importantly, not only did this project give me a new starting point, but a new perspective of my own life, too. Previously, I considered Perm quite a boring place: not obviously true, rather because I never showed interest in it. “

“Having started working at the Yeltsin Center, I discovered that the Perm people had often been the driving force behind changes outside the city. Like, when I lived in Dubai, I discovered a whole diaspora of Permians. This came as a shock, since I always regarded Perm as a small place, some kind of a province, almost a backwater in the middle of Russia. But, no! Many people are aware of Perm State University where I am currently studying at. Perm has its own sociological and linguistic schools – which are not imaginary, like a play of Perm scholars’ egos, but the internationally recognized ones. On the whole, these are the people who share their sparkle with you, some really interesting personalities and outstanding individuals. I can’t explain why these people still make Perm their homeplace. I would, of course, like to see certain opportunities allowing them to not only personally grow, but also feel required, important and in demand to Perm… For it is here, not in St. Petersburg or Moscow, Yekaterinburg or Dubai, that they might have these prospects, belonging to their home. “

Looking back, and as an afterword, Olga Averkieva, author of the project admits: “We did not mean to shoot it for the sake of cinema as art. It is a collective reflection on why people are coming back. I hope that these series may become an impact film – the one affecting the social situation in the Perm territory. Following that line, we can go to schools, colleges and social cinemas, places of free screening, where the “Back Home” series are much welcomed.” The project had already been supported by the Presidential Grants Funding and the Ministry of Culture of Russian Federation.

The “Back Home” Film – see the original episode “To Be the Happy One” 9in Russian) here.

Starring: Lidia Skornyakova, Aleksandr Noskov, Marina Garanovich, Maria Duhnova;
Script and editing: Kapitolina Dolgikh,
Camera crew: Sergey Lepikhin, Angelina Trushnikova;
Sound design: Mikhail Toropov;
Composer: Gannadyi Shyroglazov;

Project by: Olga Averkieva;
Art mentorship: Boris Karadzhev;
Produced by Olga Averkieva and Vladimir Sokolov;

The Novyi Kurs (New Course) Film Studio, Perm, Russia.  

Scroll to Top