psugeology

PSU Student from Columbia Wins Russian Language Contest

Fernando Castro (Columbia), 1st year student at the Faculty of Geology, PSU, took 3rd place at the Perm City Inter-University Olympiad in Russian as a Foreign Language.

In 2021, students from 9 countries and 6 Perm-based universities, entered the Olympiad. The contest tasks included a test, an written, and oral tasks. The winners of the Olympiad are:

1st place – Umaima Guidir, Morocco

2nd place – Wongai Chimamise, Zimbabwe

3rd place – Fernando Castro Eszibel Eloy, Colombia

To apply for the Olympics, contestants had to introduce themselves, talking about their age, studies and and hobbies, country of origin, future profession and future plans, as well as feedback about Perm.

The founders and organizers of the Olympiad were Perm Agrarian and Technological University; Perm City Youth Parliament; Perm Ethno-Centre Non-Profit Partnership; and Perm City Youth Palace. For the second year, the Olympiad takes place in online format. The has been supported by grant from Perm City Competition of Youth Initiatives Improving Inter-Ethnic Harmony.

Supporting the initiative, the grant competitors offer projects aimed at inter-university interaction of foreign students, improving inter-ethnic relations and international communication in Perm. Some projects regard social and cultural adaptation of foreign students, other aim to develop their creativity and individual progress, preventing inter-ethnic conflicts.

PSU Shares Research Experience in Serbia, Leads to Signing of Cooperation Memorandum

Olga Meshcheryakova, Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Geology, Perm State University (PSU), has successfully completed a research internship “Environmental Technologies in Karst Areas” at the Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

The participation of PSU has been performed within the framework of the “Rational Subsoil Use” Perm Research and Educational Center – leading to signing of memorandum between two universities.

The internship included lectures and workshops, ‘field’ classes and elements of scientific tourism – allowing to study innovative approaches at solving environmental problems in karst regions. The study methods were aimed at protecting karst landscapes, caves and aquifers from pollution.

As a program participant, Olga Meshcheryakova is known for being keen in various fields of expertise – being an associate professor at the Department of Dynamic Geology and Hydrogeology, and a senior researcher at the Laboratory of Geology of Technogenic Processes, Natural Science Institute, PSU.

The studies in Serbia covered such topics, as the use of underground space for economic purposes, the interaction and prospects within speleology and spelestology. The study discussion acquired to better classification of speleological and spelestological sites on the global scale.

The visits to the Center for Karst Hydrogeology and various research labs helped to broaden the internship program. “During the field practice, we took water samples, measured hydro-chemical and physical parameters of karst waters, and studied karst surfaces,” recollects Olga Meshcheryakova.

Biljana Abolmasov, Dean of the Faculty of Geology and Mining at the University of Belgrade and Olga Meshcheryakova negotiated the signing of the memorandum of cooperation between the faculties. The document implies educational programs for students, joint participation in international grant competitions, as well as running the International Karst Conference at Perm State University in 2024.

PSU Scholar Wins $1000 Award at Conference in Iran

Polina Sairanova, a post-graduate student of the Faculty of Biology, and an engineer of the Hydro-Chemical Analysis Lab at the Faculty of Geology, PSU, has entered Top 10 winners of Youth Outstanding Paper Award (YOPA) by World Association of Soil and Water Conservation (WASWAC).

The YOPA WASWAC Prize aims to encourage young scientists to research the problems of soil and water conservation in the world. The award consists of a WASWAC certification and a $ 1,000 royalty. WASWAC YOPA 2021 is provided by Beijing Datum Technology Development Company, China.

This year, the award was presented at the Third International Youth Forum on Soil and Water (IYFSWC), which took place in October 2021 at Tarbiat Modares University, Iran.

The Forum’s main theme became Soil and Water Conservation under Changing Environments. Participants from Iran, China, Russia and Italy reached the finals. Polina Sairanova became the participant to represent Russia, exclusively – presenting a report “Acid footprint in brown soils of the Middle Urals”.

Polina built her research on interpretation of the data acquired in the Basegi Reserve, Russia. Soil acidity indicators are known to be key parameters to define the direction and dynamics of soil processes – allowing to estimate the ecological state of natural objects.

10 top selected papers will be published in International Soil and Water Conservation Research (ISWCR) upon experts’ positive feedback and reviewers’ corrections.

The World Association of Soil and Water Conservation (WASWAC) as the oldest worldwide academic society in the field of soil and water conservation. The aim of WASWAC is to promote the wise use of management practices that will improve and safeguard the quality of land and water resources so that they continue to meet the needs of agriculture, society and nature.

Forum pictures’ source (Iran).

Permian: A Reason to Celebrate International Science?

180 years ago, a known Scottish explorer Sir Roderick Impey Murchison (1792–1871) introduced the term of the Permian period. What does the word Perm mean in Scandinavian? How does Perm connect with the British Empire, and its railways? Can we travel back in time to experience the Permian bloom? 

In 1840-1841, Roderick Impey Murchison, accompanied by a French paleontologist Édouard de Verneuil, a German geologist Alexander Keyserling and a Russian geologist Nikolai Koksharov, Murchison made a huge journey across Russia, covering more than 20,000 km (12,400 mi).

Marking the geographical locations of Russian cities, travelling across the Perm lands, Murchison described unusual creatures and plants through their fossil remains – labeling them with Perm, or Permian period – dominating the supercontinent of Pangaea 299 – 252 million years ago.  

Roderick Murchison had no intention of becoming a geologist: after he retired from a military service, he became fond of fox hunting. Throughout his both profession and hobby he learned to correlate his  findings with terrestrial layers, exploring and describing their texture.

Geology as a science emerged in 19th century, at the start of the railway construction in Britain. The hills and rocks, regarded as obstacles, were torn down or cut through, revealing the hidden. Standing on a trade way to Syberia, the Urals and Perm experienced the same change, hence Murchison’s interest.

Linguists and ethnographers regard 3 main origins of the word ‘Perm’: 1). the land of Bjarma, mentioned in the Scandinavian sagas; 2). the Finnish word perämaa, i.e. “far land” (as indigenous  people belong to the same Finno-Ugric language group); 3). and the local Komi-Permian word “woods, forest”.

Several international, national and particularly local museums are proud to have Permian flora and fauna exhibits in their collection, to mention the Museum of Permian Antiquities, and museums of Perm State University (PSU), serving a study ground for the Faculties of Biology, Geology and Geography. 

The collection of PSU Botanical Garden includes species representing ancient taxa, widespread in the Permian period. “The dedicated ground holds living samples of ‘Permian’ plants,  decorated with stone imprints of the era,” says Sergei Shumikhin, head of the Garden, associate professor of the Department of Botany and Plant Genetics, PSU.

Promising Professions for Future? Discover the Faculty of Geology!

Choosing a faculty? Looking for job prospects after graduating the university? Which professions prove to be profitable for a centennial period? The graduates of the Faculty of Geology, PSU, have a solid answer, indeed: many have established themselves in large international companies like “LUKOIL”, “Eurasia” or  “Uralkali”, and more.

In a nutshell, you may choose to be a…

  • Geologist – studying the composition and structure of rocks for the purpose of prospecting and exploration of mineral deposits;
  • Petroleum geologist – searching for liquid (oil) and gaseous hydrocarbon deposits and evaluates the potential of existing deposits;
  • Geophysicist – exploring Earth and mineral deposits based on the physical properties of rocks. For the processing of geophysical data, actively uses geoinformation technologies;
  • Telemetry Data Interpreter Engineer – supervising mining operations. Carries out collection, systematization and analysis of the data array received from the deposits;
  • Hydrogeologist – dealing with the search and study of groundwater, assessment of their quality and protection issues;
  • Geological engineer – engaged in engineering and geological surveys in construction during the construction and reconstruction of buildings and structures, responsible for the stability of buildings;
  • Mining Geophysical Engineer – dealing with planning, organization and management of mining operations (design and creation of new mines, open pits, etc.).

Born in 1916, Perm University was meant to meet the needs of the local industries, based mostly on natural resources. The traditional areas of activity, typical of Perm territories, have long included the search and study of gold, platinum, diamonds, oil, hard coil, iron ore and copper,  potassium-magnesium salts and their effective use.   

Till present day, the Faculty has been growing as a leading center studying the structure and composition of rocks and minerals, soil, ground- and surface water, solid and liquid industrial waste. This allowed PSU to get a National Research University status, building a dozen scientific and educational labs and starting collaborations, on national and international levels.

Currently the Faculty cooperates with universities and organizations in China, Italy, UK, Germany, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Canada, the USA, South Africa, Japan, Norway, France, India, Laos, Switzerland, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Denmark, Spain, Finland, New Zealand, Oman, Cameroon and Nigeria.

Apply to Perm State University today!



PSU Scientists Analyze Basalt Reserves in Belarus

As part of a group of Permian scientists, PSU geologists examined a deposit of basalts found in the Pinsk region (Belarus), regarding its capacity for production of cast glass-crystalline materials. The total reserves of basalt and tuff are estimated at 164.1 million tons.

“Basalt is known as one of the main ‘building components’ of the earth’s crust. Since 5/6 of the Earth’s surface is covered by oceans, it is mostly the oceanic type we are talking about. With a thickness of 5-15 km (3-9 mi), it is mainly represented by basalts. The challenges of basalt technologies have been the subject of our University scientific research for more than 10 years,”

states Dr. Vladimir Naumov, Department of Prospecting and Exploration of Mineral Resources, PSU.

The laboratory and technological samples were sent to the Natural Science Institute at Perm State University, where a complex of analytical and experimental studies have been carried, determining the composition and mineral structure of the initial substance, as well as change of its properties under the high temperatures, within melting,. Using a micro-analyzer, information on samples’ chemical composition was obtained.

“Using the potential of a specially accredited lab here at PSU, enforced by professional equipment and experts involved, recommendations were developed for methods and parameters of rock processing to obtain cast glass-crystalline materials. The scientific report showed the charge compositions with various technological additives; it served a demonstration of specialized melting equipment and principles of its operation, and also commented on physicochemical properties of the materials obtained,”

says Dr. Vladimir Naumov.

The scientists presented a technological scheme for obtaining cast glass-crystalline and welding materials, as well as information on types of products and areas of their application. Also, the analysis of market demand and final products’ application have been performed, with regard to stone casting methods, on industrial scale.

The study involved the cooperation of several research teams, as a ‘test-drive’ consortium of Perm Scientific and Educational Center “Basalt Technologies” – uniting the research Laboratory of Sedimentary and Technogenic Deposits, the Laboratory of Mineralogical and Petrographic Studies at the Natural Science Institute (PSU), the Division of Nano-Mineralogy (PSU), as well as specialists from the Perm National Research Polytechnic University and the Helium Research and Production Company.

On photo: photomicrographs of obtained cast glass-crystalline materials’ surface

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