mml-editor

PSU Scholars Become Guest Editors of Microorganisms Journal

Which knowledge, gained through university studies, will be required by your future employee? In most fields of natural production – like oil, gas or minerals’ extraction and processing, a company is interested in compliance with the international norms of environmental protection. Environment degradation makes it extremely useful to search for prevention or compensation of anthropogenic pollution. Cleaning the pollutants out of the biosphere remains a constant challenge for humanity.

The scholars from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, PSU have been invited as editors for the special issue “Microbial Biodegradation and Biotransformation” by of the Microorganisms international scientific journal (ISSN 2076-2607, Web of Science, Scopus, Q2). The issue will present experimental and review articles on modern approaches to microbial destruction and transformation of xenobiotics, as well as innovative technologies for bioremediation of contaminated ecosystems.

Xenobiotics are known as ‘unnatural’ chemical substances found within organisms, artificially introduced or unexpected; they may also be present in much higher concentrations as opposed to the usual ones. Natural compounds can also become xenobiotics if they are taken up by other organism, like the uptake of natural human hormones by fish found downstream of sewage treatment plant outfalls.

In search of rational ways of biodegradation, the efforts of most researchers have been concentrated in applied microbiology.

“Such challenge makes us expand and intensify the study of microorganisms in contaminated environments, the so-called extremotolerant microorganisms or stress-tolerants. These microorganisms play the role of a primary response system to unfavorable or potentially dangerous environmental changes, and initiate their adaptive responses at the earliest stage,”

notes Dr. Irina Ivshina, Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and professor at PSU.

Dr. Irina Ivshina and Dr. Elena Tyumina, researchers from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Perm State University, will act as guest editors for the “Microbial Biodegradation and Biotransformation” special issue, section “Environmental Microbiology” by the Microorganisms Journal. Invitations to publish are being sent to leading experts and researchers from Russia, USA, Germany, France, China, Spain, Poland, Great Britain, Australia. The articles will be peer reviewed and published accordingly, the whole process taking about two weeks. Applications are welcomed until 31 July, 2022.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging, and using its submission form, until the deadline. As already mentioned, all papers will be accepted pert arrival, peer-reviewed, and listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Original message from guest editors and editor in chief.
Special Issue “Microbial Biodegradation and Biotransformation”.

PSU International Students Awarded by Perm Territory Governor

Dmitry Makhonin, Governor of Perm Territory has expressed official gratitude to students of Perm State University (PSU) for their courage and care, shown on 20 September, 2021, at the Permian Character award ceremony, as a recognition by the state and local citizens.   

This year, a total amount of 15 young people and 5 youth public associations were given the Permian character badge, including PSU students, who helped save peoples’ lives on 20 September, 2021. Their names and stories have been included into the Honor Book of Perm.

Students Abdulla Obaid (Iraq), Ashraf Razuk (Iraq), Ovezberdi Sabyrov (Turkmenistan) from the Faculty Chemistry; Anton Grekhov (Russia) from the Faculty of Economics; Yegor Dolgich (Russia) from PSU College for Professional Education have been awarded in the nomination “Overcoming Emergency and/or Mortal Social Danger”.

The Permian Character state and social initiative, started in 2015, aims at supporting children and youth’s social activity, demonstrating responsible civil behavior, helping those in need, encouraging positive change, helping overcome difficult life situations.

Discuss Cultures, Learn More!

Looking for new friends? Want to learn Russian, or may be discuss something in English? Eager to practice your presentation skills, or just find more about countries around the globe?

17 students from the Faculty of Modern Foreign Languages and Literature, PSU, took part in the International Online Forum “Student’s Vision of the World”. The purpose of the Forum was to create a digital space for intercultural exchange, expand the scope of student activities and develop joint international and inter-institutional projects.

The projects by PSU students have been fairly recognized and certified by the Forum committee from Omsk State Agrarian University.

The Forum received over 200 applications from students from Russia, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan, Armenia, Latvia, Sierra Leone, Tajikistan, Nigeria, Estonia, Morocco and more. The projects covered a variety of broad subjects, including culture, science and sports – in the shape of essays, videos and podcasts, discussing digitalization and values of the 21st century.

Interested in the projects? Fee; inspired, see how the participants’  projects at the Forum Facebook page.

And, some more to …

…Remind, that soon prior to the Forum, the students from the Faculty of Modern Foreign Languages and Literature won the 1st prize in the International thematic discussion “Culture is the Fifth Skill”, dedicated to cross-cultural communication and nationalities across the globe.

11 teams of students in Linguistics from Russia and Belarus took part in an online discussion. The PSU team prepared a presentation on the UK, using creative approach and theatrical performance, demonstrating the British mentality, values, etiquette, traditions, verbal and non-verbal behavior.

The “Culture is the Fifth Skill” was initiated by the Francisk Skorina Gomel State University (Republic of Belarus), discussing the cultures of Japan, South Korea, Russia, Norway, Great Britain, Israel, Thailand, Australia and China.

Dive into Russia: Interview with Students from University of Oxford

The abridged version of the interview for Business-Class, 19, January, 2021

Arun Denton and Joseph Scull, students from New College, University of Oxford have shared their impressions to the Business Class (BC) News Agency – speaking of their studies in Perm, travelling around, volunteering and making friends.

BC: How did you come up with an idea of going to Perm, to study?

Arun: Joseph and I are studying Russian at the University of Oxford. In England, when doing a foreign language, you must spend a part of the 3rd year in the country of its origin. Here is where the twinning relations of our cities clicked. Some of our friends came and studied at Perm State University. They were quite happy with that, and told us about it. So, we considered it as a worthy option, and went to Perm.

BC: Were there any difficulties with preparing for the trip?

Joseph: It was all simple. We had to obtain a visa, quite a common procedure.

Arun: We too have been lucky entering Russia in mid-September. At that moment, the government canceled the mandatory two-week quarantine. So, we passed the PCR test and entered the country, experiencing no problems.

BC: Why would Russian be so interesting to you? And, when did this interest start?

Arun: When you are in school in England, at the age of 14, you have to choose a foreign language to study. So, I thought – why not Russian? Joseph and I are from different places: I am from Manchester, Joseph is from a small town of Sherborne in the south-west of the country. Yet, we were both lucky our schools had included Russian into their curriculum. The education system in England is meant to gradually decrease the number of subjects to study: first, these are 10 to 11, then 3 to 4, and finally, 1 to 2. In our case, we would tend to choose Russian language and literature.

BC: What is special about your studies here? And, how different would it be from studying in Oxford?

Joseph: Compared to Oxford, Perm State University has a lot of obligatory classes. At the University of Oxford, the main emphasis is made on independent students’ work, with individual tutorship being the core. Yet, Oxford differs from other British universities, where the system is closer to what we see here.

Arun: Now, due to the pandemic, basic disciplines are taught online, while classes of Russian are taught individually, on campus. This strategy appears to be quite effective and useful.

BC: Do you happen to communicate with other University students?

Joseph: For sure, we do. Still, due to the pandemic, as have to visit on-campus classes on our own, individually. Here in Perm, we are staying in the family of Irina, a teaching professor at the Faculty of Geography. She had introduced us to her students. We do meet often, the all guys are quite friendly and helpful.

BC: How did your parents and friends treat your idea of going to Perm?

Arun: None of them had ever heard of Perm before. In this regard, the fact of twinning relations helped a lot. Thanks to Mrs. Karen Hewitt, Professor at St Antony’s College, University of Oxford, these links have been growing for quite a while, obviously having a long story behind them.

Joseph: My parents and friends see Perm as a fairly good option. Indeed, there are many foreign students in Moscow or St. Petersburg, where you can communicate in English. Here, Arun and I, just two of us, are enjoying the opportunity of nearly a private dive into Russia.

BC: To which extent have your expectations about Russia and Perm appeared to be true?

Arun: To be honest, I had little expectations, as I knew too little about the city, although I did read about the history of Perm, too. So, we have been making our opinion of the place right on the spot.

BC: Russians are be believed to be self-reserved or reluctant for communication… Have you come across that, at all?

Arun: Maybe, on the street, people do look closed and show less emotion. Yet, as you start talking, everything changes. We usually communicate with those whom we live with, our students, or folks in a café. We are curious to hear stories, and the locals expect the same from us. Almost all people are open and happy to communicate.

BC: What have you been doing during your spare time?

Arun: We have traveled around the Perm territory, a bit. We have been to the smaller towns and places of Kudymkar, Kungur, Ilyinsky, Chermoz, Khokhlovka, and the Usvinsky pillar stones.

BC: Not that every Perm-local visits so many places, like you have done…

Joseph: We know we have been lucky. As I said, we are staying in the family of Irina and Alexander. Irina is a teaching professor at the Faculty of Geography, and Alexander performs well as a tour guide, so we did have really interesting trips around!

BC: Are there any things, which you particularly miss in Perm – like pubs, football or Scottish haggis?

Joseph: Oh, no! I am very glad that there is no haggis in Perm (laughs). In fact, we do not feel being deprived of anything here. For basic needs, our life is set perfectly well. The Russian cuisine is different from ours, but we like it. Pubs are really very important in England, but there are good bars in Perm, too. As for football, we have seen Amkar FC twice, and once Molot hockey team. So, everything is fine, and not so boring at all.

BC: You have taken part in a volunteer campaign, here in Perm, right?

Arun: Yes, together with the “Territory of Rest” Day Shelter we have participated in the “Food on the Wheels” program – providing an opportunity for those homeless and in need – to get warm lunch. We helped distribute food, first in the disctrict of Zakamsk, other side of the river, and then in the city center.

BC: How long will you be staying in Perm?

Arun: We will be going home to England for Christmas. And, in mid-January we will be coming back to the city of Pyatigorsk – to continue our studies at a local university.

BC: Any plans to re-visit Perm?

Joseph: On a whole, we have an idea of crossing Russia by train, on the Trans-Siberian Railway – that would be great! Here in Perm, we have developed a great touch with Irina and Alexander – the family we are staying with. I believe we will try to visit them, for sure.

BC: Your future occupation – will it be connected with Russia?

Arun: I have always wanted to speak Russian fluently. It would be great to work in Russia, or with it.

Joseph: After studying in Russia, we will have one more year at the University of Oxford, so, there is plenty of time for future decisions.

BC: You have mentioned you learned about Perm through twin cities relations with Oxford. To which extent, in your view, does twinning make sense?

Joseph: I’ll tell you a short story. Arun and I were at Perm School №7 – meeting with schoolchildren, talking about England. Suddenly, I noticed a poster with my hometown of Sherborne there. It turned out that this School cooperates with the Sherborne Girls School, and my sister was here as part of an exchange program – can you imagine that? Unfortunately, there are currently no such exchanges. Yet, they should be restored, since they make people communicate and learn about each others’ life and culture – here, locally, in the middle of Russia.

Arun: The links between the universities are also quite necessary and useful. Every year, students from Oxford come to Perm to study and practice. New knowledge, new contacts – all these are really important for the modern world.

News Source (original).

PSU Student from Columbia Wins Russian Language Contest

Fernando Castro (Columbia), 1st year student at the Faculty of Geology, PSU, took 3rd place at the Perm City Inter-University Olympiad in Russian as a Foreign Language.

In 2021, students from 9 countries and 6 Perm-based universities, entered the Olympiad. The contest tasks included a test, an written, and oral tasks. The winners of the Olympiad are:

1st place – Umaima Guidir, Morocco

2nd place – Wongai Chimamise, Zimbabwe

3rd place – Fernando Castro Eszibel Eloy, Colombia

To apply for the Olympics, contestants had to introduce themselves, talking about their age, studies and and hobbies, country of origin, future profession and future plans, as well as feedback about Perm.

The founders and organizers of the Olympiad were Perm Agrarian and Technological University; Perm City Youth Parliament; Perm Ethno-Centre Non-Profit Partnership; and Perm City Youth Palace. For the second year, the Olympiad takes place in online format. The has been supported by grant from Perm City Competition of Youth Initiatives Improving Inter-Ethnic Harmony.

Supporting the initiative, the grant competitors offer projects aimed at inter-university interaction of foreign students, improving inter-ethnic relations and international communication in Perm. Some projects regard social and cultural adaptation of foreign students, other aim to develop their creativity and individual progress, preventing inter-ethnic conflicts.

A Story of PSU Student in Search of Homeplace – to and from Dubai, Back to Perm

Olga Averkieva, a senior teacher at the Department of Journalism and Mass Communications at Perm State University (PSU) has brought together the stories of nine characters who had left Perm but came back to discover their own way in local arts, business and social life, as a set of documentary shorts – uniting them into the “Back Home” Film Project.  

The fifth short episode shows Lidia Skornyakova, a graduate student of the Faculty of Philology, PSU. Having had entered the University once, studying Journalism and Philology here, she then worked as an exhibition manager and art critic for the Yeltsin Center, Ekaterinburg, Russia, and later moved to Dubai, UAE. Yet, she got back to Perm… Following Lidia, in her own words:

“This is a brief story how I learned to be happy – getting back to where I once belonged. I was born in Perm. After school, I entered the Faculty of Philology at Perm State University. I initially went to study journalism, but got bored, and switched to philology, since I had always been into foreign languages. By 2011, when I was supposed to graduate from the Faculty of Philology, I experienced life crisis. That time, I found escape to be the only way to resolve my problems. I decided that moving to a different city and connecting myself to a different activity would make me different, too – and so shake my previous burdens off. I got carried away by an idea of becoming an art critic. I went to the city of Yekaterinburg, 3,5 hours car drive from Perm, and started looking for a job. My first serious professional occupation was the one at the Yeltsin Center, dedicate to the 1st Russian President and his era. The project had just been launched, encouraging each one of us to do our best. I remember myself getting into the thick of it, quite intensely. “

“The first time I went abroad was in 2012, a trip to Thailand. It all seemed a different planet to me, contrasting to my own environment and family’s vision that travels are for the rich people, as they don’t mind wasting money on nonsense; “What for? At which expense? Why not buy something practical, like kitchen crockery, instead?” After leaving the Yeltsin Center, I flew to Dubai. And, while I was moaning there to a female friend of mine, saying I didn’t want to return neither to Perm, nor Yekaterinburg… since after the Yeltsin Center everything seemed so low-scale and much too common to me… my friend told me: “Go, try find a job here! Elsewise, what’s the use of studying English for so many years?’ So, I did go and did find one. I became a real estate consultant with a 1,5 year contract. Gradually, I started getting tired of Dubai, feeling lack of cultural activity and native language communication in its deeper sense – looking for ideas and things to discuss instead of everyday routine, you know? I was missing performances, plays, theaters. The situation at my work did not get better, either. First, I realized that selling real estate was not my cup of tea. And, secondly, there was a moment when they decided to fire everyone right on New Year’s Eve. I didn’t like the idea of waiting for my turn, and flew back to Perm. ”

“Gosh, finding myself back home in Perm, I rushed headlong to the local stage scene and shows, at last! I did everything I could: the Philharmonic, the Organ Hall, the Cultural and Business Center, the Opera and Ballet Theater, and many other places, almost every day. I started thinking of where to study. And, as I stepped onto the University campus, something clicked – as it always did, and does every time I get in here: my goodness, how cool is the vibe, that’s  the place I’ve been missing! The Master’s Degree in Chinese was well announced, so, I passed the exams, and our Dean Dr. Boris Kondakov called me to say: Welcome to the Faculty, glad to have you back! “

“When I started my Master’s, I had been working, already. An old friend of mine had offered me to take part in a cool project by the Morse Code Creative Agency – a company dealing with museum design. As a result, I started a project that I am finishing now, telling the story of Perm basketball. I see it as my personal ‘Yeltsin Center’. Most importantly, not only did this project give me a new starting point, but a new perspective of my own life, too. Previously, I considered Perm quite a boring place: not obviously true, rather because I never showed interest in it. “

“Having started working at the Yeltsin Center, I discovered that the Perm people had often been the driving force behind changes outside the city. Like, when I lived in Dubai, I discovered a whole diaspora of Permians. This came as a shock, since I always regarded Perm as a small place, some kind of a province, almost a backwater in the middle of Russia. But, no! Many people are aware of Perm State University where I am currently studying at. Perm has its own sociological and linguistic schools – which are not imaginary, like a play of Perm scholars’ egos, but the internationally recognized ones. On the whole, these are the people who share their sparkle with you, some really interesting personalities and outstanding individuals. I can’t explain why these people still make Perm their homeplace. I would, of course, like to see certain opportunities allowing them to not only personally grow, but also feel required, important and in demand to Perm… For it is here, not in St. Petersburg or Moscow, Yekaterinburg or Dubai, that they might have these prospects, belonging to their home. “

Looking back, and as an afterword, Olga Averkieva, author of the project admits: “We did not mean to shoot it for the sake of cinema as art. It is a collective reflection on why people are coming back. I hope that these series may become an impact film – the one affecting the social situation in the Perm territory. Following that line, we can go to schools, colleges and social cinemas, places of free screening, where the “Back Home” series are much welcomed.” The project had already been supported by the Presidential Grants Funding and the Ministry of Culture of Russian Federation.

The “Back Home” Film – see the original episode “To Be the Happy One” 9in Russian) here.

Starring: Lidia Skornyakova, Aleksandr Noskov, Marina Garanovich, Maria Duhnova;
Script and editing: Kapitolina Dolgikh,
Camera crew: Sergey Lepikhin, Angelina Trushnikova;
Sound design: Mikhail Toropov;
Composer: Gannadyi Shyroglazov;

Project by: Olga Averkieva;
Art mentorship: Boris Karadzhev;
Produced by Olga Averkieva and Vladimir Sokolov;

The Novyi Kurs (New Course) Film Studio, Perm, Russia.  

PSU Scholars Discuss Erasmus+ Opportunities, National and International

The team of the International Academic Cooperation Office at Perm State University visited the International Office of the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (KBFU, Kalinigrad, Russia).

PSU team discussed the nearest perspective of science diplomacy and international cooperation, following the goals of the Perm Scientific and Educational Center “Rational Subsoil Use”.

The partners paid special attention to the ARTEST international project, implemented within the Erasmus+ mission, co-initiated and supported by Perm State University. The meeting raised questions of quality standards in the project management, implementation of current tasks and technical solutions, both on- and off-line.

The International Erasmus+ project “ARTEST: Enhancing education programmes in Arts and Humanities via European STEM methods and tools” aims to rethink education in humanities in line with EU standards, research and practices – to catch up with the latest trends of the labour market and reinforce education by adopting digital methods of research and education. The geography of the project connects Europe and Asia, covering countries from Germany to Mongolia. The project also connects historical cultural heritage and the latest digital technologies.

More information about the ARTEST project might be found here.

On behalf PSU, Natalya Dobrynina, Kristina Vetrova and Anna Peisakhovich regarded the opportunities of grant opportunities for international audience – contributing to major academic and research events, and interaction with invited scholars as a part or science diplomacy, within joint international projects.

Anna Belova, KBFU spoke about the specifics of academic communication with the countries of the Baltic region. Tatiana Tsvigun, Head of the Institute for the Humanities, emphasized the relevance of joint initiatives in digital humanities and interdisciplinary research. Olga Kim, Vice-Rector for International Affairs and Youth Policy, KBFU and the PSU team discussed the ways of further cooperation between the universities.

“We are always glad to host partners from Perm State University. Regardless of the difficult times in international cooperation, live communication and professional exchange remain important – ensuring the development of effective communication within the project consortia. The experience of our Perm colleagues in the implementation of Erasmus+ projects has been especially valuable for us, ”

said Daria Gerber, Head of the International Office, KBFU.

The Erasmus Programme (EuRopean Community Action Scheme for the Mobility of University Students”) is a European Union (EU) student exchange program, established in 1987. The new Erasmus+ program combines all the EU’s current schemes for education, training, youth and sport. The Erasmus Student Network consists of 534 local associations (“sections”) in 42 countries and has more than 15,000 volunteers across Europe. As of 2014, the Erasmus program has promoted the mobility of more than 3.3 million students within the European community. More than 4,000 university institutions from 31 countries are participating in the project.

PSU Biologists and Hydrologists Contribute to Rivers of Europe Book

The Elsevier has published the second edition of the Rivers of Europe, ed. by K. Tockner, C. Zarfl, C.T. Robinson. As in the case of the first edition, researchers of the Faculty of Geography and the Faculty of Biology, Perm State University (PSU), contributed to the publication.

The book describes the biological and geographical features of the Volga and its tributaries, notably the Kama river and Perm-related part – serving the overall vision of the aquatic organisms and ichthyo-fauna, typical of the vast Volga-basin valley. It took 3 years to prepare the publication.

The contributors included researchers from the Department of Hydrology and Protection of Water Resources, the Department of Zoology of Invertebrates and Aquatic Ecology and the Department of Vertebrate Zoology and Ecology, PSU – making 1/3 of the section.

“The result is the most important reference book on all major European rivers, reflecting their current state. The urgent demand and feedback by its readers soon after the first publication in 2009 caused the editing team to start working on an updated version, nearly immediately,”

says Mikhail Baklanov, Head of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology and Ecology, PSU.

Interested on what is the Rivers of Europe about? Want to know more about Perm and the Kama basin?

The Volga River, at 3690 km (2293 mi), is known to be the longest river in Europe, 5th in Russia and 16th globally. The Volga flows into the Caspian Sea, the largest inland sea on Earth, covering various biomes from taiga to semidesert, holding about 151,000 rivers of which 2600 flow into the Volga directly – the Kama being its largest tributary, 5th longest river of Europe, crossing the vast Perm territory, and more.

Deriving its name from the Udmurt “kam”, meaning “river” or “current”. The river became a major link of communication between Asia and Europe. Originally colonized by Fins at the end of the 11th century, it saw the first Russian traders 3-4 centuries later, giving birth to Perm settlement and providing Imperial Russia with minerals, timber, fur and metals for production of armour and cannons.

Related section of the Book concerning the Kama river covers paleography; physiography, climate, and land use; geomorphology, hydrology, and biogeochemistry and questions of pollution; aquatic and riparian biodiversity – including plants, algae, zooplankton, zoobenthos and fish; questions of management and conservation; paleography of the catchment; physiography, climate, and land use.

Today, the Kama catchment consists of 12 administrative regions with a total population of 29 million people. Among them, >10 million (~40%) inhabit the adjacent riverine floodplain. Ferrous and nonferrous metallurgy, coal industry, oil processing, and engineering and chemical industries cause heavy mining activity. Industrial discharge from the river-side cities are the main sources of pollution.

Providing a comprehensive outlook of the Volga and Kama basin, regarding their challenges and prospects, the PSU researchers see the increased content of manganese and iron compounds in water as a result of both anthropogenic and natural factors, including the bed weathering. In general, waters of the Kama are suitable for technical and domestic water supply, after treatment and disinfection.

The book experts, contributing to the research and publication, included Dr. Svetlana Dvinskikh, ScD. Victor Noskov, ScD. Alexander Kitaev, ScD Margarita Aleksevnina, ScD Anna Istomina, ScD Elena Presnova, ScD Mikhail Baklanov, Dr. Evgeny Zinoviev from the faculties of Geography and Biology, PSU.

Please, see the PDF of the Rivers of Europe enclosed.

PSU Improves Sustainable University Status in UI GreenMetric 2021

On 14 December 2021, the UI GreenMetric has announced the World University Rankings Results and Awards. The ceremony took place online in Jakarta, Indonesia. According to the Ranking, Perm State University (PSU) has moved up from 446 to 428 place, globally.


For two years already, PSU has been ranked 16th among the total of 54 Russian universities, having participated in the ranking for two years in a row. On the European scale, PSU takes 132 place. According to UI in GreenMetric’2021 Global Ranking, PSU shows the following results:

Perm State University Global Rank – 428
Total Score – 5850
Transportation – 1175
Education & Research- 1150
Waste – 1125
Energy & Climate Change – 1025
Setting & Infrastructure – 825
Water – 550

In 2021, the UI GreenMetric World Ranking was attended by 956 universities from 80 countries around the world. Informally, according to a feedback by UIN Syarif Hidayatullah Jakarta, 154 world universities fall into the Gold Cluster category, 435 universities are in the Silver Cluster category, and 367 universities are in the Bronze Cluster category: https://www.uinjkt.ac.id/ui-greenmetric-2021-uin-jakarta-achieve-the-2021-most-sustainably-improved-university-status

At the global level, the five highest rankings were respectively achieved by Wageningen University & Research (Netherland), University of Nottingham (UK), University of Groningen (Netherlands), Nottingham Trent University (UK), University of California, Davis (USA).

According to UI GreenMetric vision, regardless of the existing rankings, a need for a uniform system addressing the problems of sustainability and environmental impact allowed them to launch a new ranking, marking universities’ ability to reach Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), since 2010.

In their present greetings letter, the UI GreenMetric team has stated that the rankings participants “have successfully demonstrated improvement in their university strategic measures to achieve SDGs in all aspects of their university activities… to create the most sustainable world campuses.”

UI GreenMetric Ceremony Picture Source.

Press Release UI GreenMetric 2021.
PSU.ru Factfile 2021 Full.

PSU Interpreters Become Part of International Charity

Enjoy communicating with people and volunteering? Like languages and translation? Ever thought of becoming a part of big international charity? Make it happen with us, see successful practices and contacts below!

In cooperation with the So!Art Association (Belgium), students of the Department of Linguistics and Translation, PSU provided support for the Artisans of Hope Project (Artisans de l’Espoir) to stimulate various skills of independence in children with cerebral palsy. The project collaborates with Russian and European specialists, enabling them to interact in a series of three-month distance internships.

Daria Tyurina performed two-way simultaneous interpretation of therapy classes online, edited and localized specialized texts, and helped in compiling a glossary of professional terms. Ekaterina Babich translated and worked on the content of fresh reports about the Association’s projects in social networks, while also preparing the project’s charity event.

“As a starting point, I had a poster for the upcoming charity evening in support of children with cerebral palsy and other movement disorders. Lacking details, I had to do a lot of preparation myself, looking for additional information – from how the charity meetings are generally held, to the biographies of the participants and the assortment of the sponsoring store. I felt I was doing something really important, and it gave me motivation. I was pleased to make my own modest contribution to the So!Art activity, while gaining a lot of experience, knowledge and skills myself,”

Ekaterina Babich has stated.

Despite the remote character of interaction, the So!Art Association and students have been working in tight contact along the way, getting mutual feedback at every stage. This allowed the translators to upgrade their competences on the go.

“Ekaterina Babich approached her task thoroughly and creatively. She showed enthusiasm and a serious approach at creating announcements for one of our most important events. Daria Tyurina, on the other hand, coped with interpretation brilliantly. Taking into account the high level of knowledge and the variety of competencies of your students, we are very pleased with the result of our cooperation,”

comments Daria Gissot, head of the So!Art association, founder of  Artisans of Hope Charity.

The Artisans of Hope aims to bring together cross-border experience and socialization – teaching independence and physical stimulation skills for children with neurological and physical disorders. Inviting experts, combining best international practices, addressing various programs to help rehabilitate children with neurological disorders, the European socio-cultural association So!Art launches intensive courses and programs in the field.

Further prospects of cooperation Perm State University and So!Art include assistance for and rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy, as well as speech therapy and other competency-stimulating techniques. This is a complicated topic that requires high translation skills, which are permanently upgraded at the Department of Linguistics and Translation, PSU. The joint project will be continued in the near future, inviting University students for internships alike.

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